Tag Archives: Commodore 64

Nightmare (without the ‘K’)

Title: Nightmare
Format: C64
Release date: 1991 (?)
Obtained: Unsure, probably around 1992-3
Place of purchase: The Guild Adventure Software (public domain)
Price: Approx. £1
Completed?: Yes

A text adventure by a chap called William Quinn, Nightmare was one of the first things I remembered buying (using pocket money via by mum’s chequebook) from mail-order firm The Guild. This was a company run by Anthony Collins that specialised in text adventures; I recall that you used to get their ‘catalogues’ on photocopied sheets of A4, and that the proprietor would hand-sign the compliments slip that came with every purchase. I’m not sure how I actually came across The Guild in the first place, though it probably must have been via Zzap! 64 or Commodore Format, as these were pretty much the only place I got games information back in those pre-Internet days.

On the other hand, I do remember how I came across William Quinn: it was a copy of LA Adventure Part I on Zzap! megatape 31. I’ll talk in detail about that game at some other point, but I enjoyed it and it made me want to play more of Mr. Quinn’s titles. Nightmare was the first other one I bought, and I enjoyed it immensely. The story was pretty simple: you wake up one night only to find that, actually, you haven’t woken up and that you’re having a nightmare. This is the sort of realisation that never actually happens during the nocturnal hours, but that didn’t particularly bother me at the time I played it. Your character was tipped off that ‘it was all a dream’ by the fact that your room was tidy; in typical game fashion, this sparks off a quest, specifically to find the bag of rubbish that once filled your room and return it back to its previous state of disshelvement.

Playing through the game again now, it still seems funny, though perhaps in a way that would have appealed more to me as a ‘young adult’ than it does nowadays when I’m an old-fuddy-duddy. This is hardly surprising, though, as I’d hazard a bit of a guess that the author wasn’t that much older than I was when he wrote the game. It suffers all the typical text adventure problems of irritating parsers and too heavy a reliance on trial-and-error to get through the not-always-entirely-logical-puzzles. The game was made using the Graphic Adventure Creator (or GAC for short) and, as such, comes with the rather annoying habbit of taking a long time to respond to commands you’ve entered, particularly if they’re not recognised. Even playing the game on an emulator at 200% speed there’s still a very noticeable wait in-between pressing the enter key and the game getting back to you. Still, you got used to this kind of thing back in the 8-bit days.

At the time Nightmare made me want to make my own text adventures, and though I never got very far with any that I started on, I think its surrealism and style of humour has had a fair impact on things that I’ve written over the years. I’m not sure that I’d actually want to bother playing it all the way through again now unless I was really at a loose end, but in fairness this is probably more to do with the style of game rather than the game itself: the text adventure is a relic of a bygone age and only the very best examples are playable today.